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A haiku and a picture. (wordless wednesday no.18)





Snarled tangled We

Mangle inseparably

Pleasure Pain and Love!


© 2010 Preeti Shenoy



For more poems click here. Some poems have already appeared in print. Kindly do not reproduce without permission.



Comments

  1. That's a very nice close-up detail of the wires. I see a letter "A" in it.

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  2. Hey, Inspiring words... I have this strange feeling of separation whenever i see such a barbed wire, like someone is bound and cant get free...

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  3. Ohh beautifully written - Simply fantastic!

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  4. @catsynth so true..just noticed it after i saw your comment..

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  5. I donot know what is happening here!! Whenever i comment here(this post) someone would also be doing the same simultaneously..happened twice before.. will it happen a third time?

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  6. Barbed ironies warn
    Trespassers keep a distance
    Lest ye be caught fast

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  7. Sukhmandir: Nice one even though it isnt 5-7-5. Thanks for dropping by--happy ww!

    Shantharam: :-)Barbed wires do say 'keep out' and 'ouch'. I cut my leg across one after I clicked the pic. But luckily no scars :)

    Ruch: Thank you! It's a strict 5-7-5 too. My first 'strict' Haiku.If you have written any I'd love to read..please send them to me. I love Haiku.

    Catsynth: Yes--I had noticed the A too :-)

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  8. 5-7-5 refers to the sounds (syllables) does it?

    nice imagery!

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. I love Haiku -there is a haiku post on my blog - not written by me but just the translations of a few of my favorite haikus in Japanese.The originals in japanese are simply superb.
    I am more of a 55 fiction sort of writer :-)

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  11. nice snap for wordless wednesday.

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  12. Shimmer: Interesting is an interesting word :)

    Jyotiajay: Thanks.I liked the snap too. It was clicked in Kerala but really it could have been anywhere.

    Ruch:Will surely check it.

    Suma: thank you. Pic clicked by yours truly :) Yes--5-7-5 is syllable count. Its really hard to get exact number of syllables yet express what you want.

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  13. Marvellous Preeti!

    The picture speaks the same as the haiku!
    Beautiful!

    http://shindeneeraj.blogspot.com

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  14. I love Haiku and I am glad you have discovered it.
    Can you also bring nature into your Haiku when you attempt it next?
    Great picture too!

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  15. Brilliant photo and caption, poetic words!Beautiful shot!

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  16. this is one of the best Haiku ive read! its so true! :)

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  17. There is something beautiful about pain,

    When felt so close up,

    The tangles of life have put our deaths in place...

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  18. Hi there!
    Hmm such complexity in a tiny bit of barbed wire.

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  19. Hey! You are back!
    I like the new look :)
    great photograph too xo

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  20. The last line totally totally shifts the whole thing. Loved it :)
    Good Haiku is tough, as i am finding it now :). This one is super good

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  21. Prashant: yes, struggled a bit with that one..and here, when u read it, the we can be interpreted in two ways :) It can be 'snarled tangled we' or 'we mangle inseparably'. I liked the pic more though! Was on the phone to you minutes before I clicked it in my mom's village. Managed to cut my leg as well :)

    Gillian: Thank U! :)

    Devilmood: Happy new year! Yes--a complex bit of wire indeed :)

    Committed to life: Thanks! I was pleased with it too.

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  22. Kamal: Death is always in place, isnt it? I agree about the beauty in pain.

    Sunshine: yes! Thank u! :)

    Kiki:Thank you so much! Very kind words indeed.

    Bimal:Thanks a lot! I too liked the pic more than Haiku. I do love the Haikus where there is nature but I also like the ones which capture a relationship.

    Neeraj:Thank you so very much!

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  23. 這麼好的部落格,以後看不到怎麼辦啊!!!........................................

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  24. I dont know what you have written in Chinese--i presume it is something good. (and i presume it is chinese too :P ) Either ways--thank U :)

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  25. awesome macro...

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