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Child with a view!


This image, again clicked by Atul,(aged 9) caught me by surprise, when he showed it to me. (click on photo to enlarge.I simply loved the details)

Made me think about how we, as adults, stop noticing the tiny things—The pebbles for instance. Looking at the world through the eyes of a child, really changes your perspective.

I have worked with children, for many years now—and what amazes me is their originality and the unfettered creativity, not bound by adult notions, the innocence, the joy and the unconditional love that you receive, as one of the primary care givers.

A few years back, when I used to teach at a pre school, the moment I opened the gate there would be a large group of children aged between 3 & 4, all running towards me with outstretched arms, shouting my name, wanting a hug! I had to put my handbag down and hug each one, before I could proceed to the class room.

Children are so expressive. And so frank. They are observant, sharp and keep you alert and thinking. And how they make you laugh!

Sometimes, they do get on your nerves—but they teach you to have tremendous patience too :-)

I, for one, am really happy and thankful that I have kids! For now, I cannot imagine how empty my life would be, without them.

Comments

  1. Photographer Atul does have my admiration!
    Have a nice and photographical weekend :)

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  2. Jonice: Thank you!Thats a splendid idea--especially as I have nothing planned for weekend!Atul says thank you too!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Alfred Hitchcock has influenced him.
    Very talented :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Deepak:Will tell him.Thank you for the very encouraging words.He has not even heard of Hitchcock!

    ReplyDelete
  5. He is truly talented.
    You are so right about the creativity of children and I envy how they haven't learned that they 'aren't doing it right' yet. I totally cringe when well meaning adults say 'Let me show you how to do that better.' or words to that effect.
    When my girls were little I used to give them things to create with and just let them go. I wouldn't tell them what they were 'supposed to do' or give them suggestions, I would just say, 'What ever you want. There is no wrong way.' and then just watch what they would come up with.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Rayne: You seem to steal the words right from inside of my head--and you express exactly what I mean--only better!
    Yes, I too cringe when adults say "colour this leaf green." Or "Let me teach you how to make that picture"
    You and i seem to think so much alike.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Preeti,
    was taking a break from my 'shikkap'.
    Yes, Children are amazing. I worked with the special ed preschool kids for 8 years at the same elementary school where Anni was, and I learned unconditional love from them. I would love it when the kids would pick up a bunch of grass with a daisy or a dandelion on their walk to the school from home, or from home itself,and bring it all withered in their hands for me. I would make such a big deal about it and fill a small cup from the kitchen center with water put the 'bouquet' in it, and leave it on my table. i also loved it when they brought me 'pretty pebbles for you, Ms. Gayathri'.!!!!!- yup!!! everyone of them could say my name perfectly by the end of the first week.
    By the way, the photograph is very cool- u have a talented young photographer in the making.

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  8. He has a future there :)

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  9. Brilliant photo..this reminds me of Peter Pan...

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  10. Gayathri :yep--i too valued the gifts my little students gave me.

    Niall: Two great minds do think alike--but then again Fools seldom differ too!! I like to think of the former being true in this case :-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. wow he's a great kid!

    Keshi.

    ReplyDelete

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